Wednesday, June 30, 2010

Carmel Fest Festival 2010

Camp Bow Wow will be at Carmel Fest on Sunday July 4th from 12-10 pm and Monday July 5th from 12-10:30 pm. There will be a parade on Monday from 10:30am-12pm and fireworks that night at 9:45 pm. The festival includes a multitude of vendors, arts and crafts booths, delectable festival foods, civic organization booths, an interactive KidZone (with a petting zoo, pony rides, games, and a family entertainment stage), a Civil War reenactment campground, the eclectic Americana North Zone (with zany entertainers, classic cars, Frisbee-catching dogs, a performance stage, displays and rides), CarmelFest Has Talent vocal competition, and a fabulous line-up of musical entertainment on the Gazebo Main Stage.

Carmel Fest takes place at Carmel Civic Square. The address for Carmel Civic Square is:
1 Civic Square
Carmel, IN 46032
We hope to see you all there!

Friday, June 25, 2010

Summer Time Heat Stroke

Summer is a dangerous time for dogs living in hot climates. Many dog owners think their dog will be fine if left in the car for a short amount of time as long a the windows are cracked. Please be aware that leaving a dog in a hot car is very dangerous and could result in health problems for your dog and legal problems for you.

Heatstroke is an increase in body temperature above normal levels. It can cause irreversible health issues including brain damage and organ failure.

Signs of heatstroke:
Anxiety
Panting
Drooling

Dogs with thicker coats and shorter faces are at a higher risk of heat stroke than other breeds.

If you leave your dog in the car on a hot day, animal control has the authority to issue a ticket for neglect.

So please be careful and try to bring your dog with you when you shop as often as possible.

Check out this video of some of the dogs at camp cooling down in the pool today!



video

The Ten Commandments for Dog Owners

This is a great article that we stumbled across and something every dog owner should read!

1) My life is likely to last 10 to 15 years. Any extended separation from you will be very painful.

2) Give me time to understand what you want from me. Do not break my spirit with your temper, though I will always forgive you. Your patience and understanding will teach me more quickly those things you want me to learn.

3) Treat me kindly, my beloved friend, for no heart in all the world is more grateful for your kindness than mine. Don't be angry with me for long, and don't lock me up as punishment. After all, you have your job, your friends, your entertainment. I only have you.

4) Speak to me often. Even if I don't understand all your words, I understand your voice when it's speaking to me. Your voice is the sweetest sound I will ever hear, as you must know by my enthusiastic excitement when your footsteps fall upon my waiting ear.

5) Please take me inside when it's cold and wet. I'm a domestic animal and no longer am accustomed to the bitter elements. I ask for little more than your gentle hands petting me

6) Keep my bowl filled with clean water; I cannot tell you when I'm thirsty. Feed me good food so that I may stay well to romp and play, do your bidding, to stand ready by your side, willing to share with you my life, for that is what I live for. However you treat me, I'll never forget it.

7) Don't hit me. Remember, I have teeth that could easily crush the bones in your hand, but I choose not to bite you.

8) Before you scold me for being lazy or uncooperative, ask yourself if something might be bothering me. Perhaps I'm not getting the right food, I've been out in the sun too long, or my heart is getting old and weak.

9) Take care of me when I get old. You will grow old, too.

10) When I am very old, when I no longer enjoy good health, please do not make heroic efforts to keep me going. I am not having fun. Just see to it that my trusting life is taken gently. Be with me on that difficult journey when it is time to say "goodbye". Never say, "I can't bear to watch." Everything is easier for me when you are there.. I will leave this earth knowing with my least breath that my fate was always safest in your hands. Remember- I love you.

Thursday, June 24, 2010

Pictures from Camp!

Check out some pictures from camp today!






CarmelFest 2010

Camp Bow Wow will be at Carmel Fest on Sunday July 4th from 12-10 pm and Monday July 5th from 12-10:30 pm. There will be a parade on Monday from 10:30am-12pm and fireworks that night at 9:45 pm. The festival includes a multitude of vendors, arts and crafts booths, delectable festival foods, civic organization booths, an interactive KidZone (with a petting zoo, pony rides, games, and a family entertainment stage), a Civil War reenactment campground, the eclectic Americana North Zone (with zany entertainers, classic cars, Frisbee-catching dogs, a performance stage, displays and rides), CarmelFest Has Talent vocal competition, and a fabulous line-up of musical entertainment on the Gazebo Main Stage.

Carmel Fest takes place at Carmel Civic Square. The address for Carmel Civic Square is:
1 Civic Square
Carmel, IN 46032
We hope to see you all there!

Thursday, June 17, 2010

Choosing a Boarding Facility that is Right for you!



You’ve got your bags packed and ready to head out to Florida for a week in the sun. You’ve got your suntan lotion, a new bathing suit that actually fits you, a new SLR camera……..and oh,……who are you going to trust with caring for Fido while you are gone?


Finding the right place to board your dog can take a little homework on your part to ensure that Fido’s vacation is as fun as yours.

All reputable dog boarding facilities will require that your dog’s vaccinations are updated so have a copy available for their records.


Required vaccinations include distemper and rabies. Most facilities also require bordetella, to prevent canine cough, if your dog will be interacting with other dogs. This vaccination is typically given via an injection initially and then an intranasal booster is given every 6 months.


Traditional boarding facilities offer a safe environment for your dog. However, your dog will spend most of his day in a cage and have little to no interaction with other boarders. Caring staff will feed, water and let your dog out to do his business, but they may charge extra for walks, one-on-one playtime, or administering medications. These costs can add significantly to the base rate of the boarding stay. These boarding facilities are ideal for older dogs, dogs that don’t require much activity and younger pups that are not yet spayed or neutered.


Open play environments are ideal for more active, social dogs. Dogs often have to pass an ‘interview’ process to make sure they play well with other dogs. Questions to ask of staff include:


1) Are the play yards indoor /outdoor or just indoor?

2) Do all dogs play together or are they divided by size and temperament?

3) What is the required staff to dog ratio?

4) How does the staff manage the dogs’ behaviors in an open play environment?


Often just calling out the dog’s name or administering a compassionate squirt of water can redirect a dog who is getting too rambunctious or grumpy with his dog buddies. Open play environments are a great social experience for your dog and your dog is likely to have as much fun on his vacation as you are having on yours. And just to make sure, some facilities have webcams so you can watch your dog play while you are away!


Because doggie daycare and boarding is a service-based industry, the facility should be able to accommodate your dog’s needs within reason. This may include feeding your dog his particular diet two or three times per day, providing extra naps as needed or administering medications. Also, ask about staff training. The staff should have basic training in dog behavior and first aid and all staff should be aware of emergency procedures in case a dog becomes ill or is injured.


Safety features to look for include fire alarms, smoke alarms, ambient temperature controls and emergency evacuation procedures. Check to see what environmental barriers are present to keep your dog safe if he were to escape from his kennel or play yard. Cleanliness is also important to ensure your dog is not exposed to bacteria, viruses, or other bugs that may cause illness. Floors and all contact surfaces should be swept and mopped frequently with chemicals that are dog-safe yet provide optimal cleaning and prevent unwanted smells.


And finally, take your dog in to tour the facility and perhaps let him spend a day before you leave him for an extended stay. This will help Fido get used to the new environment and ease your mind that he’ll have a great time on his vacation too!

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Keep Summer Fun!

Dehydration
With summer in our mist, you and your dog will be taking advantage of the great weather to walk the Monon, play frisbee in the back yard, or romp with canine friends. However, hot temperatures and exercise can lead to dehydration in your pet with fluid losses of as little as 4 – 5 %. Dehydration also leads to the loss of important electrolytes including potassium, chloride and sodium which are important for muscle contractions and nerve impulse transmission.

Humans have 2.6 million sweat glands to cool our body as sweat evaporates off the skin. In contrast, our canine friends only have sweat glands on their nose and foot pads. Therefore, a dog’s primary means of heat dissipation is from panting; rapid, shallow respirations with open-mouthed breathing. Panting allows for evaporative cooling via increased air flow over moist surfaces in the upper respiratory tract. If excessive fluids are lost from panting and the movement of fluids from the cells to the body, dehydration may result.

Signs of dehydration include:
 Lethargy
 Tremors
 Increased body temperature
 Sunken, dry eyes
 Loss of appetite
 Elevated heart rate
 Dry mouth tissues
 Prolonged capillary refill

Tests you can perform on your dog to check for dehydration include:
 Skin elasticity: Pinch the skin on your dog’s back between your thumb and index finger. Once released, the skin should quickly pop back into place. Under conditions of dehydration, the skin will lose its elasticity. Thinner and older dogs’ skin will be less elastic than younger and fatter dogs. Therefore, it is important for you to know what is normal for your dog.
 Prolonged Capillary Refill: Push your finger firmly on your dog’s gums until the gums turn white. Remove your finger and count how long it takes the gums to return to their normal pink color. In a normal dog, the capillaries should immediately refill. Under conditions of dehydration, the time to refill with blood will be prolonged to 2-3 seconds. Again, you should test your dog under “normal” conditions in order to establish a baseline to compare to.

As a general rule of thumb, dogs need approximately once ounce of water per pound of body weight per day but this amount can be significantly increased with environmental factors, stress, or with certain health conditions. Working dogs and performance dogs should be hydrated prior to competition as exercise can increase water loss 10 -20 times over the resting rate. Elderly dogs with compromised kidneys or dogs on medications that are metabolized by the kidneys especially need to maintain adequate hydration. Always keep fresh water available for your dog at home and carry a portable source of water for him when traveling.

If your dog is dehydrated, introduce water to him slowly. Gulping water can lead to vomiting and further dehydration. Don’t give you dog dry food. Keep him in a cool place while you slowly re-hydrate him with water. Don’t use cold packs to cool him down was this can constrict blood flow. Contact your veterinarian as medical care may be needed to introduce IV fluids in cases of severe dehydration to prevent heat stroke.

Friday, June 4, 2010

American Red Cross Pet First Aid/CPR Training


Camp Bow Wow Carmel is sponsoring an American Red Cross Pet First Aid/CPR community training session and we want you to be a part of it! The training is going to take place on Wednesday, June 16th from 6:30 - 9:00 pm. All of our counselors are certified to take great care of your dog. We want you to get certified so your dogs are safe at home as well! The training session will be taking place at 14300 Clay Terrace Blvd, Suite 204, Carmel, IN 46032. Please call Lisa Beals @ 317-408-1870 or email us at carmel@campbowwow.com for more information.

For only $40.00 you could learn how to save your pet's life!